About Dr Jennifer Martinick

Dr Jennifer Martinick has over 30 years experience in medicine and has been specialising in hair transplantation since 1978. She is internationally acclaimed for her work in the field of hair loss and for combining medical knowledge with her artistic skill for outstanding results in hair transplant surgery .

Ways to Curb Hair Loss & Promote Hair Regrowth by Martinick Hair Restoration

If you or a loved one is experiencing hair loss or hair thinning you should make time to a hair loss specialist or trichologist. These experts will diagnose and give appropriate advice about the condition of your hair and ways to promote hair regrowth. Dr Martinick of Martinick Hair Restoration is the immediate past president of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgeons (ISHRS)

However, as soon as you recognise hair loss it is essential to stay away from dyes, chemicals, and aggressive shampooing and blow drying to prevent further damage to the hair follicles. When the hair follicles are under too much stress they tend to die out, which leads to hair loss and eventually baldness. Thus, staying away from harsh products is vital for promoting hair restoration.

Along with that, a healthy diet also goes a long way in promoting hair regrowth both for men and women. Through research it has been revealed that lack of nutrition leads to unhealthy hair growth and hair loss, as the hair roots do not get the necessary nourishment. For this reason one may need protein, vitamin, and iron supplements as part of their hair loss treatment plan.

A healthy lifestyle with enough sleep and exercise also contributes to a healthy body and in turn, healthy hair. It has also been observed that mental stress and strain leads to ill health and hair loss. Hence, meditation and yoga, can help you lead a stress free life and prevent hair loss.

Moreover, massaging your scalp regularly with olive oil or vitamin E oil helps stimulate the follicles and promote hair regrowth. Massaging increases the blood circulation within the scalp and stimulates healthy hair regrowth.

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Dr Jennifer Martinick – Committing to Excellence in Hair Loss Solutions & Hair Restoration

Martinick Hair Restoration’s Dr Jennifer Martinick believes modern hair transplant surgery has undergone remarkable evolution over the past 15 years. In the right surgical hands, modern follicular hair transplantation (FUT) produces a result so natural in appearance it can only be detected on close examination by other hair transplant physicians. This is a stark contrast to the very obvious looking transplants of the past Dr Martinick says.

Dr Martinick says quite justifiably, early techniques involving transplantation’s of groupings of hairs to create a plug like effect and the old fashioned bell shaped hairlines have been the subject of considerable derision.

She says the remarkable progress reflected in modern hair transplant techniques follows many years of collective research and development and refinement in surgery by dedicated physician members of the recognised medical body on hair restoration, the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS).

Dr Martinick says the refinement of surgical techniques has also brought wider social acceptance of hair transplantation.

Dedicated hair restoration physicians do not take this for granted.

There is acknowledgement that the profession of hair restoration must continue with its quest for excellence as well as ensure high levels of accountability and transparency.

Dr Martinick, past president of the ISHRS, says part of the ongoing work for greater consumer awareness about hair restoration surgery is to make it easier for members of the public to find out about the level of experience and ongoing commitment to continuous education of physicians in the field.

To this end, the ISHRS has established a three tiered membership, which includes the categories of associate member, member and the higher category of a Fellow of the ISHRS.

Dr Martinick says each tier of membership is designed to reflect the level of further education a physician has undertaken in the field of hair restoration surgery.

The entry level associate membership is awarded to doctors who are working in the field, but haven’t undertaken the ISHRS’s prescribed continuous education.

Eligibility for full membership and the right to use the ISHRS logo requires the physician to attend a minimum of four three day scientific meetings.

Dr Martinick says the Fellowship Members category is awarded to physicians who have accumulated 50 continuous education points through regular attendance at scientific meetings, sharing the findings of their research at meetings, publishing papers and ongoing professional development.

Along with hosting regular scientific meetings, the ISHRS also provides a broad range of other educational sources, including video and power point presentations on training of surgical staff, for its physician members.

Dr Jennifer Martinick shares Young Men’s Hair Loss Experiences Part 2

The limitations hair loss sufferers impose on themselves are often based on an extremely poor self image, says Lachlan who lost his hair in his early thirties.

Lachlan says it wasn’t until after having a transplant that he became aware of just how limiting his “obsession with his hair loss” had been.

Lachlan, a fitness trainer and part-time actor says many of his friends and clients now comment that up until recently, they have never seen him without a hat.

“Once my hair started to grow again I became free of this all consuming bloody-mindedness about concealing my hair loss,” Lachlan says.

“I had spent a good ten years of my life wearing a hat everywhere and I hadn’t noticed how much of an obsession it had become.

“It’s been well worth the investment in a hair transplant to start living life more freely again.”

Shaun, a university student, says the onset of androgenetic alopecia at just 16 sparked the beginning of a downward spiral of depression, drug taking and excessive alcohol consumption.

Shaun, who appealed to Martinick Hair Restoration’s Dr Jennifer Martinick to perform a hair transplant two years ago, now shows no former signs of hair loss.

He says regaining his hair gave him the confidence to give up a labouring job, apply to university and meet his life partner.

He learned about Dr Martinick’s work from a psychologist who was treating him for depression.

“I then ended up seeking a consultation with Dr Martinick who put me on a course of hair loss medication and some regular topical treatments, “Shaun says.

“She also advised me to make lifestyle changes regarding an improved diet and exercise as well as drinking the occasional glass of red wine.

“I saw Dr Martinick on a regular basis for almost two years before she agreed to perform a hair transplant.”

Dr Martinick says she eventually agreed to proceed with Shaun’s transplant even though he was only 23 at the time.

“I have generally waited until a patient is at least 26,” Dr Martinick says.

“But it isn’t always that black and white particularly when you have a young patient and there is a large psychological component to their hair loss.

“This young man was deeply depressed and his hair loss was having an enormous impact on his quality of life.

“He has since moved on with his life and many positive things have happened for him.”

Dr Jennifer Martinick shares Young Men’s Hair Loss Experiences Part 1

The limitations hair loss sufferers impose on themselves are based on an extremely poor self image, says Nigel who lost his hair in his early thirties.

Nigel says it wasn’t until after having a transplant that he became aware of just how limiting his “obsession with his hair loss” had been.

Nigel, a fitness trainer and part-time actor says many of his friends and clients now comment that up until recently, they have never seen him without a hat.

“Once my hair started to grow again I became free of this all consuming bloody-mindedness about concealing my hair loss,” Nigel says.

“I had spent a good ten years of my life wearing a hat everywhere and I hadn’t noticed how much of an obsession it had become.

“It’s been well worth the investment in a hair transplant to start living life more freely again.”

Shaun, a university student, says the onset of androgenetic alopecia at just 16 sparked the beginning of a downward spiral of depression, drug taking and excessive alcohol consumption.

Shaun, who appealed to Dr Jennifer Martinick to perform a hair transplant two years ago, now shows no former signs of  hair loss.

He says regaining his hair gave him the confidence to give up a labouring job, apply to university and meet his life partner.

He learned about Dr Jennifer Martinick’s work from a psychologist who was treating him for depression.

“I then ended up seeking a consultation with Dr Jennifer Martinick who put me on a course of hair loss medication and some regular topical treatments, “Shaun says.

“She also advised me to make lifestyle changes regarding an improved diet and exercise as well as drinking the occasional glass of red wine.

“I saw Dr Jennifer Martinick on a regular basis for almost two years before she agreed to perform a hair transplant.”

Dr Jennifer Martinick says she eventually agreed to proceed with Shaun’s transplant even though he was only 23 at the time.

“I have generally waited until a patient is at least 26,” Dr Martinick says.

“But it isn’t always that black and white particularly when you have a young patient and there is a large psychological component to their hair loss.

“This young man was deeply depressed and his hair loss was having an enormous impact on his quality of life.

“He has since moved on with his life and many positive things have happened for him.”

Dr Jennifer Martinick changed the Life of a Young Man

Calling a nightclub ahead of arriving to seek permission to wear a hat was once a normal part of Ryan Gaw’s weekend routine.

The ritual, which Ryan now views as extreme, was just part and parcel of having to cover up the hair loss that started in his late teens.

Like many young men who’ve experienced early onset of androgenetic alopecia, wearing a hat became a major social crutch for Ryan.

Without this hat he felt unattractive and vulnerable. He was also an easy target for insensitive quips about his hair loss.

Nowadays, Ryan who regained his hair through a transplant, says the time in which he invested so much energy in concealing his thinning hair seems a million life times ago.

But it was less than two years ago that he sought medical help for his condition with renowned hair restoration physician Dr Jennifer Martinick.

In June 2008 he had a 2,000 graft hair transplant and nowadays any signs of his former hair loss are almost impossible to detect to the untrained eye.

“It took me a good ten months to stop thinking about the need to keep a hat on,” Ryan says.

“I no longer use a hat unless I need it for protection from the sun.”

Ryan is now drawing on his personal experiences in his work as a consultant to New Hair Clinic in Sydney.

He says his experience has made him acutely aware of how young men, who are affected by hair loss, often hold themselves back in life.

He recalls how he felt alienated from his peers and how he reinforced his own isolation by refusing to return phone calls or rejecting social invitations.

“Hair loss actually affects the way you live your life,” says Ryan.

“A lot of people don’t realise that.

“The thought of going to a social event without my hat once terrified me.

“If I was going to a night club ahead of time, I’d call ahead and tell the manager that I was having treatment for cancer or had a scar and needed to keep my hat on.

“They don’t like you to wear a hat because of security reasons.

“So I would make up all kinds of excuses to try to ensure I could keep my hat on.

“I am quite embarrassed about the sorts of things I did, but that’s what I had to do in order to ensure that I could keep my hat on.”

Ryan says he inevitably encountered social and work situations where he wasn’t able to wear a hat.

He says an office job for an electrical wholesaler in Perth saw him enduring many months of ridicule by a former boss who only ever addressed him as “Friar Tuck”.

Desperately depressed, he quit his job, sold his home in Perth’s northern suburbs and moved to Sydney to start afresh.

Part of that fresh start involved seeking a permanent solution for his hair loss, so he sought an appointment with a hair loss clinic advertised on television.

“I decided that I wanted to get a transplant because I wanted to restore my hair once and for all,” Ryan says.

But a “serendipitous” wrong turn in a Bondi street led to a consultation with Dr Jennifer Martinick.

Ryan says along with the relief of discovering the level of treatment available he was comforted to learn he was not alone in his feelings of depression and devastation about hair loss.

The psychological effects of hair loss, particularly among young men, are greatly underestimated says Dr Martinick.

Dr Martinick, who is secretary of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) says feelings of isolation, depression and poor self esteem are common among men with androgenetic alopecia.

“I’ve come across situations where some young men are so deeply depressed about their hair loss that they stop socialising and undertaking any activities that will put them in the spotlight,” Dr Martinick says.

“This limits their quality of life and often prevents them from achieving their potential in their personal and professional lives.”

Dr Jennifer Martinick says many young men tell her they have chosen occupations that allow them to fade into the background.

She says it is heart warming to witness the changes that some patients make in their lives after their hair starts to grow again.

“I’ve had patients who tell me they’ve deliberately taken jobs as labourers or fishermen to ensure they can keep their hat on,” Dr Martinick says.

“It’s amazing to see the life changes made after they regain their hair.

‘I’ve seen them go back to study, find life-long partners or start up successful new business ventures.”

Dr Martinick says that as a general rule she doesn’t perform hair transplants on men under 26, however she believes there are circumstances, where a more flexible approach is needed.

She says her professional concerns are that young men can be unrealistic about what can be achieved from a hair transplant and expect to regain the hair line they had when they were 18.

In many cases, these young men do not comprehend they only have a limited number of follicles for transplanting to achieve the results they desire.

“But if I am presented with a mature 21 year-old with a realistic perception of what hair transplanting can achieve  – and his hair loss is interfering with his quality of life – then I’ll consider undertaking a transplant,” Dr Jennifer Martinick says.

“I have a much more open mind about transplanting young men than I had a couple of years ago as I understand they are only young once.”

Dr Martinick says a common problem among young men is they often don’t notice the early stages of hair loss.

She advises young men with androgenetic alopecia to seek treatment as early as possible to prevent further hair loss and, in the event that they may eventually choose to have a hair transplant, ensure they preserve precious donor follicles.

Dr Jennifer Martinick : Hair loss and insensitive jokes ….

If you are balding or have thinning hair it’s highly likely that you’ve been subjected to the odd tasteless joke and tacky innuendo.

The courtesies of political correctness are often not extended to people affected by hair loss and remarks about the light bulb, boiled egg, baldy bonk and chuppa chup often flow freely from family, friends and work colleagues.

These cliched jokes and insensitive labels, about a disorder which affects up to 70 per cent of men and 50 per cent of women at some stage of their lives, are simply dismissed as harmless banter.

But, according to a leading researcher and hair restoration specialist these remarks can exacerbate the feelings of vulnerability, loss of self identity and self esteem that hair loss can evoke.

The psychological effects of hair loss, particularly among young men, are greatly underestimated says renowned hair restoration physician Dr Jennifer Martinick.

Dr Jennifer Martinick, the 2012 president of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS), says feelings of isolation, depression and poor self esteem are common among men with male pattern baldness.

“I’ve come across situations where some men, particularly young men, are so deeply depressed about their hair loss that they stop socialising and taking part in any activities that will put them in the spotlight,” Dr Martinick says.

“This limits their quality of life and often prevents them from achieving their potential in their personal and working lives.”

Dr Martinick, has spent many years refining the Martinick Transplant Technique ™ – a transplant technique that is internationally recognised as the gold standard in hair transplants.

Martinick Hair Restoration’s physician says proven treatments for hair loss include clinically approved oral medications, topical solutions, low frequency laser therapy and a hair transplant.

Transplanting different groupings of hair follicles together – something unique to the Martinick Transplant Technique ™ – has the advantage of creating a more natural and denser looking head of hair.

Dr Jennifer Martinick says many of her patients tell her they view permanent hair restoration as a valuable personal investment in themselves that will pay lasting dividends.

She says along with the obvious benefits of having their hair permanently restored, patients speak about other changes they have made in their lives.

“It’s amazing to hear the many stories that patients share,” Dr Martinick says.

‘Patients have spoken about going back to study, finding life-long partners or starting up successful new business ventures.”

Dr Martinick says a common problem among young men with male pattern baldness is they often don’t notice the early stages of hair loss.

She advises these men to seek treatment as early as possible to prevent further hair loss and, in the event that they may eventually choose to have a hair transplant, ensure they preserve precious donor follicles.

While there has been remarkable evolution of hair transplants over the past decade, it is important to be aware that not all hair transplants are the same, Dr Martinick says.

She advises anyone considering a hair transplant to conduct thorough research before committing to surgery.

Dr Jennifer Martinick: Providing Effective Hair Restoration Solutions

Hair loss is not an uncommon condition these days. A majority of men as well as women suffer from the emotional stigma attached with severe hair loss conditions. Unfortunately, many of such patients are not aware of the advanced hair restoration options.

Dr Jennifer Martinick of Martinick Hair Restoration clinic is a successful and well-known surgeon who is credited for the development of the distinguished hair transplantation technology – The Martinick Technique TM.

Dr Jennifer Martinick reviews the hair loss condition of the patients, analyses the reasons behind it, and then based on various parameters and factors, derives a suitable hair restoration solution of the patient. The patients can opt for surgical or non-surgical procedures to treat the hair loss. Along with these, the team of experts and highly trained staff put in their efforts to give the patients a comfortable and pleasant environment.

The reason that Dr Jennifer is so popular, and a preferred name among the hair loss patients is her rich experience and skills in performing hair transplant. Her aim is to deliver natural looking hair transplants for the patients, which permanently solves the hair loss condition.

Treating your hair loss condition is an easy step. All you need to do is consult Dr Jennifer Martinick and choose the treatment that is the most suitable one for you. Rest all will be taken care of by the well trained and friendly staff of Martinick Hair Restoration clinics.